Skip to main content

‘MRI’

Grissom awarded $1.4 million NIH grant to develop smaller, quieter MRI system

Sep. 1, 2020—Vanderbilt engineers have received a $1.4 million NIH grant to work toward a compact, silent, less expensive and potentially portable MRI device. The team, led by William Grissom, associate professor of biomedical engineering, will develop new hardware, including low-field radio frequency transmission coils and amplifiers, and software that will together translate signals measured from the...

Read more


Does named Fellow of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 

Aug. 11, 2020—Mark Does, professor of biomedical engineering has been selected as a Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. His research program focuses on developing and applying MRI methods to quantitatively characterize various properties and/or compositions of tissue. It includes developing models of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and water diffusion in tissue, development...

Read more


MASI Lab and EnvoyAI to develop abdominal segmentation algorithms

Jan. 10, 2018—The MASI lab is collaborating on the development of deep learning algorithms for abdomen segmentation that leverage artificial intelligence to better understand and diagnose disease. The MASI lab, affiliated with the Vanderbilt Institute for Surgery and Engineering, is working with a team from EnvoyAI, which aims to simplify access to new AI algorithms by providing direct access to...

Read more


VISE symposium gives first look at medical technology, recap of tech unveiled this year

Nov. 16, 2015—A symposium out of Vanderbilt University’s newest institute will provide participants a first look at medical technology coming out of our labs and a recap of tech unveiled at conferences around the world this year. The research to be presented at the Dec. 16 Vanderbilt Institute in Surgery and Engineering (VISE) event aims at making...

Read more


New device will allow brain surgery through cheek, helping people with epilepsy

Oct. 1, 2014—For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy can mean drilling into the skull – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. But a team based at Vanderbilt University School of Engineering wondered: What if it were possible to address epileptic seizures and other brain disorders in a less invasive way? It would mean inventing...

Read more


Will Grissom makes problem-solving nerds look cool

Sep. 25, 2014—“I live for the problems we get to solve,” says Will Grissom, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, radiology and electrical engineering. The problems Grissom refers to revolve around magnetic resonance imaging – helping clinicians see inside the human body, discovering new ways to target diseases and creating more effective and efficient health care solutions. Self-described...

Read more


Landman takes Outstanding Teacher Award for ISMRM talk

Sep. 16, 2014—Of all the professors who spoke during a recent International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine course, the crowd appreciated Vanderbilt Engineering’s Bennett Landman the most. Landman, assistant professor of electrical engineering, learned this week that he won the society’s Outstanding Teacher Award for his talk “Compressed Sensing for Fast Acquisition.” It was part of...

Read more