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October, 2014

Capstone app project for MOOC aims to track, help manage cancer patients’ pain

Oct. 24, 2014—  Nearly every nation on the planet saw at least one resident enroll last year in a Vanderbilt University massive online open course on programming for Android devices. Now, after a series of three courses that saw as many as 250,000 students taking them at a time, 1,165 budding programmers are participating in the university’s...

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Game theory can help predict crime before it occurs

Oct. 20, 2014—About a decade ago, the hit movie Minority Report featured a police force that could predict crimes and swoop in before they happened. That kind of crime fighting may not be far off if a team headed by Eugene Vorobeychik, assistant professor of computer science and computer engineering, has its way. While the movie cops...

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Entrepreneur Center turns attention to music startups

Oct. 19, 2014—Nashville’s next tech accelerator shouts Music City, and it’s looking for Vanderbilt University engineering students to answer. After five years of launching successful startups in other industries, the Nashville Entrepreneur Center is teaming with the Country Music Association for its first music-focused accelerator. Health care and tech have dominated Nashville’s startup scene because music licensing...

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Zelik explores biological mechanisms behind human movement

Oct. 17, 2014—  Karl Zelik, assistant professor of mechanical engineering (Anne Rayner/Vanderbilt) Karl Zelik’s BAT lab in Olin Hall has nothing to do with flying mammals or a caped superhero. The Biomechanics and Assistive Technology laboratory is dedicated to locomotion—in particular, to understanding the mechanisms of human locomotion and using engineering to improve movement and mobility for...

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Denver hospital, Vanderbilt exoskeleton clinical trial discussed at leadership exchange

Oct. 16, 2014—Some of Denver’s top executives learned Thursday how collaboration across Vanderbilt University schools and departments leads to world-changing technology. But they also found out about a collaboration closer to their home – a clinical trial at Denver’s renowned Craig Hospital involving its spinal cord rehabilitation patients and Vanderbilt researcher Michael Goldfarb’s robotic lower-limb exoskeleton. Mike...

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Vanderbilt professor, Army Reserve colonel to JROTC: ‘We’re going to depend on you’

Oct. 16, 2014—An engineering professor who serves in the Army Reserve told Chicago teens they must be ready to replace a generation of retiring engineers, and the problems they’ll solve will be tougher than any found in textbooks. Col. Eugene J. LeBoeuf, chief of staff of the 416th Theater Engineer Command, is a professor of civil and...

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Fluid power industry, academic leaders pack panel discussion on advances

Oct. 14, 2014—If America wants to keep its edge in fluid power, its engineers must find ways to add even more value to manufacturing components, work across disciplines and make everything smaller. Fortunately, engineering professionals in both research and industry are up to the task, an expert panel addressing the Fluid Power Innovation and Research Conference said...

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Computer science alums’ 12-year-old company profitable since day one

Oct. 14, 2014—Rustici Software, founded and co-owned by computer science alumni Mike Rustici (BS’99) and Tim Martin (BS’97), has been profitable since day one of its founding 12 years ago. It also may have one of the coolest, offbeat websites. Ever. The Franklin, Tenn.-based company serves the e-learning market and projects 50 percent revenue growth in the...

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