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Autoimmune drug shows promise in treating severe burns

Jan. 12, 2022—A severe burn injury is not static. Within 72 hours, partial thickness burns can progress, or convert, to full thickness burns, greatly increasing the risk of infection, incapacitating scarring, and even death. Preventing the conversion is one of the most challenging aspects of treating burns, and a trans-institutional team of researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical...

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Vanderbilt-developed gunshot detection technology leads to arrest in Las Vegas shooting

Jan. 10, 2022—Janos Sallai, PhD’08, is company’s chief technology officer Gunshot detection technology developed by Vanderbilt engineers and commercialized by a longtime research partner recently helped lead to an arrest in a fatal shooting in Las Vegas. Within seconds of the first shot in late August 2021, 16 sensors located along the Freemont Street Experience pedestrian mall...

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Game theory points to new DNA data privacy solutions

Dec. 17, 2021—by Paul Govern Information based biomedical discovery, in particular the push toward precision medicine, depends on open-ended analysis of de-identified data from patients and research participants on the largest possible scale. Sharing data while controlling the risk of data reidentification under privacy attack is vital to the enterprise. Zhiyu Wan Game theory indicates that only...

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Vanderbilt engineer leads DARPA project to enable AI machines to gain, share knowledge

Dec. 2, 2021—Kolouri wins $1M DARPA grant to investigate AI cooperative lifelong learning A Vanderbilt engineering professor is leading part of an international initiative to create advanced artificial intelligence programs that will enable machines to learn progressively over a lifetime and share those experiences with each other. Researchers hope the technology will allow machines to reuse information,...

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Vanderbilt engineers’ Science paper reviews scope of atomically thin membranes for subatomic separations

Dec. 1, 2021—A paper by Vanderbilt engineers that explores the scope to scale up the sizes of atomically thin membranes and their potential use in applications relating to energy, microscopy, and electronics is published in the journal Science. Authors Piran R. Kidambi, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Pavan Chaturvedi, postdoctoral scholar in the Department of...

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New study reveals breakthrough tool to show how much exoskeletons reduce back injury risk

Nov. 30, 2021—A study led by researchers from Vanderbilt University’s Center for Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology reveals a breakthrough tool to assess the effect of exoskeletons on injury risk. The tool, called Exo-LiFFT, is an interactive calculator that will help companies looking for ways to overcome workforces struggling with musculoskeletal injuries, missed work, and accelerated retirement...

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Headband device suitable for use at home with young ADHD patients

Nov. 16, 2021—A Vanderbilt biomedical engineering professor has developed a prototype headband to measure brain activity that could have widespread application in studying and ultimately treating ADHD and other neurological disorders. The device is lightweight, portable, and inexpensive to construct. Prototype components cost less than $250, compared to costs exceeding $10,000 for commercial systems. Audrey Bowden, associate...

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Vanderbilt to lead $5 million Air Force center of excellence in radiation effects research on electronics

Oct. 29, 2021—Center aims to advance the understanding of physical mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced effects on emerging technologies The Institute for Space and Defense Electronics at Vanderbilt University has been selected as the Center of Excellence in Radiation Effects by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Air Force Research Lab. The $5 million, five-year program will be...

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