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‘NIH’

On-the-move cancer cells prefer a “comfort cruise,” follow predictable paths of least resistance

Sep. 13, 2019—New research from a group of Vanderbilt biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they’re rather lazy in which paths they choose. According to the researchers, migrating cancer cells decide which path in the body to travel based on how much energy it takes, opting to move through wider, easier to...

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Chang, Englot receive $3 million NIH grant for epilepsy imaging work

Aug. 29, 2019—A team led by an engineering professor who specializes in techniques to analyze functional neuroimaging data and a neurosurgeon-scientist has received a $3 million NIH grant for epilepsy research. This is the third major NIH R01 basic research grant Vanderbilt School of Engineering and Vanderbilt University Medical Center teams have received in less than a...

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Like geese and race cars, cancer cells draft their way to new sites

Mar. 25, 2019—Finding gives boost to fighting through cell metabolism NASCAR has nothing on cancer cells when it comes to exploiting the power of drafting, letting someone else do the hard work of moving forward while you coast behind. Building on the relatively new discovery that metastatic cancer cells leave tumors and travel in clusters, not singles,...

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Skin diseases study uses crowdsourcing to gather data

Mar. 1, 2019—For any number of diseases involving the skin, research into causes and cures requires isolating and quantifying in a reliable way the proportion of affected skin, one research subject after another, the more the better. This is achieved with medical photography, computer monitors, and mouse-dragging by a research dermatologist to carefully demarcate affected areas. With...

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Researchers collaborate on $3.9 million NIH study of child-specific cochlear implant programming

Feb. 27, 2019—Researchers from the School of Engineering and Vanderbilt University Medical Center are working to improve outcomes for children with significant hearing loss by providing individualized, prescription-like programming for their cochlear implants. The study, funded by a $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, to aims to determine whether the approach will impact a...

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New biomaterial could improve bone grafting

Feb. 25, 2019—A new biomaterial-based bone graft extender created by Vanderbilt and U.S. Army researchers has the potential to improve treatment of critical orthopedic conditions. While a graft using a patient’s own bone  – typically from the pelvis or femur – for re-implantation is considered the standard technique to repair, replace or regenerate bone tissue, limitations exist....

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Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

Feb. 22, 2019—A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification – commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link specifically between Celebrex and heart valve calcification. W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering, Meghan...

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First step toward model brain: turning iPSCs into working blood-brain barrier

Feb. 21, 2019—Vanderbilt University engineering researchers took a major step toward building a “brain in a dish:” They cultured induced pluripotent stem cells into a successful three-dimensional blood-brain barrier model. The future of drug testing and disease research lies in creating organoids, or models of human organs, to determine efficacy and potency of medications. Duplicating the endothelial...

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