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‘NSF CAREER Award’

Kidambi receives NSF Early Career Award to support atomically thin membrane research

Jan. 10, 2020—Piran Kidambi has received a 2020 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development grant. The five-year, $500,000 grant—Deconstructing Proton Transport through Atomically Thin Membranes—begins July 1, 2020. Kidambi, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, will use the award to support his research on membrane technology. His work focuses on  atomically-thin two-dimensional materials that allow...

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Hatzell awarded NSF CAREER grant to expand research on lithium-ion batteries

Apr. 9, 2019—Kelsey Hatzell, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development grant. The five-year, $515,600 grant— Understanding Interfaces in Solid State Energy Storage Systems and Cross-Disciplinary Education—begins June 1, 2019. Advanced lithium-ion batteries for vehicles and for renewable electricity grid storage could improve domestic energy security but performance gaps...

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Lippmann awarded NSF CAREER grant to study mechanics of blood-brain barrier

Apr. 3, 2019—Ethan Lippmann, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development grant. The five-year, $401,650 grant—Deconstructing Neurovascular Mechanobiology—begins July 1, 2019. Lippmann studies changes in brain vascular physiology due to aging or disease. “The goal of this award is to investigate the hypothesis that changes in the...

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Duddu awarded NSF CAREER grant to better understand Antarctic ice sheet fracture

Apr. 1, 2019—Improved models of iceberg calving will reduce uncertainty in sea level rise projections An assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering has been awarded a $555,000 NSF CAREER grant to analyze Antarctic ice sheet fracture, improve models for ice mass loss and reduce uncertainty in long-term projections of average sea level rise. “There is concern...

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Ultrasound helmet would make live images, brain-machine interface possible

May. 8, 2018—Brett Byram, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, is developing a helmet that allows for brain ultrasound imaging. (Daniel Dubois/Vanderbilt University) Ultrasound technology for the brain could mean real-time images during surgery, a better idea of which areas get stimulated by certain feelings or actions and, ultimately, an effective way for people to control software and...

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Byram receives NSF career development award

Apr. 11, 2018—Brett Byram, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development grant. The five-year, $549,995 grant – Ultrasound Brain-Computer Interface – begins May 1, 2018. The award funds the development of a next-generation ultrasound device to enable real-time ultrasonic visualization, without the use of contrast agents, of brain perfusion...

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Vorobeychik receives NSF career development award

Feb. 28, 2017—Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, assistant professor of computer science and computer engineering, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development grant. The five-year, $518,000 grant – Adversarial Artificial Intelligence for Social Good – begins March 1, 2017. Vorobeychik combines approaches from artificial intelligence and game theory to solve important social problems, for instance, police and...

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Wilson receives National Science Foundation CAREER Award

Apr. 4, 2016—John T. Wilson, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development award. The five-year, $500,000 grant – Engineering Polymeric Nanomaterials for Programming Innate Immunity – will allow Wilson to develop new synthetic materials for “encoding” immunological messages and tightly regulating their delivery to the organs, cells,...

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