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‘environmental engineering’

Alumnus elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Feb. 8, 2019—John H. Koon, BE’67, MS’69, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to the design of systems to treat chemically complex industrial wastewaters. Koon, P.E., is president of John H. Koon & Associates in Atlanta and professor of the practice of environmental engineering at Georgia Tech. Koon is a board certified...

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Grad student wins first place in DOE nuclear R&D competition

Jun. 8, 2018—Brandon Chisholm, a doctoral student in environmental engineering, has received a first place prize in the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2018 Innovations in Nuclear Technology Research and Development competition. Chisholm’s award is in the energy policy category, and his award-winning research paper, “Preliminary Risk Assessment of a Generalized Molten Salt Reactor Off-Gas System,” was presented...

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DOE official and Engineering alumna designing nuclear cleanup curriculum

Nov. 14, 2017—A legacy that dates to the Manhattan Project left 107 U.S. sites where energy research and weapons production created conditions that require specialized cleanup. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees these locations, has made much progress, but plenty of complex, expensive work remains. Sue Cange, who has three decades of experience in federal...

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Ph.D. student publishes illustrated children’s book to explain water quality issues in Bangladesh

Oct. 26, 2017—Farzana is a fictional little girl from the mind of environmental engineering Ph.D. student Chelsea Peters, but there are thousands of real children like her in Bangladesh, walking for miles to find clean water for their families. They, like their children’s book counterpart, may struggle to understand why they are surrounded by water they can’t...

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Measuring drought impact in more than dollars and cents

Apr. 14, 2016—(iStock) The standard way to measure the impact of drought is by its economic effect. Last year, for example, the severity California’s four-year drought was broadly characterized by an estimate that it would cost the state’s economy $2.7 billion and 21,000 jobs. However, there are many experts who feel economic measures alone are inadequate to...

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Vanderbilt team gets context, closer look for Sterling Ranch sustainability projects

Jan. 22, 2016—A team of 30 Vanderbilt University students and professors from across the disciplines spent a series of information-packed, 14-hour days in suburban Denver to understand better how their work will lead to smart, sustainable cities. They returned from that winter break trip with the context of research already underway – projects that are the result...

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Fourth environmental engineering professor is certified by U.S. academy

Sep. 29, 2015—Mark Abkowitz is the fourth Vanderbilt environmental engineering faculty member in three years to be accepted into the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists as a board certified environmental engineering member. Abkowitz, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, professor of engineering management, and director of the Vanderbilt Center for Environmental Management Studies (VCEMS),...

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VU’s more specific drought-measuring tool could help shape policy

May. 26, 2015—A more specific drought-measuring formula created by a group of Vanderbilt University environmental engineers could have implications for emergency planning, federal relief payouts and drought mitigation efforts. With California’s record drought sending the state and farmers to the bargaining table over water, officials there and in other drought-stricken states are calling for more specific city- and...

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