Skip to main content

‘NSF’

New biomaterial could improve bone grafting

Feb. 25, 2019—A new biomaterial-based bone graft extender created by Vanderbilt and U.S. Army researchers has the potential to improve treatment of critical orthopedic conditions. While a graft using a patient’s own bone  – typically from the pelvis or femur – for re-implantation is considered the standard technique to repair, replace or regenerate bone tissue, limitations exist....

Read more


Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

Feb. 22, 2019—A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification – commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link specifically between Celebrex and heart valve calcification. W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering, Meghan...

Read more


First step toward model brain: turning iPSCs into working blood-brain barrier

Feb. 21, 2019—Vanderbilt University engineering researchers took a major step toward building a “brain in a dish:” They cultured induced pluripotent stem cells into a successful three-dimensional blood-brain barrier model. The future of drug testing and disease research lies in creating organoids, or models of human organs, to determine efficacy and potency of medications. Duplicating the endothelial...

Read more


Labels like ‘Asian fail’ and ‘Black genius’ are no joke for STEM students of color: report

Jan. 23, 2019—Racialized terms like “Asian fail” and “Black genius” are proving detrimental both physically and emotionally for students of color according to a new NSF report. (iStock) A new National Science Foundation-funded report published in AERA Open documents the negative effects labels and stereotypes are having on high-achieving Asian and Black college students. Vanderbilt professor Ebony...

Read more


Nanoparticle targets tumor-infiltrating immune cells, flips switch telling them to fight

Jan. 21, 2019—New research builds on Nobel-winning immune checkpoint blockade work Immunotherapy’s promise in the fight against cancer drew international attention after two scientists won a Nobel Prize this year for unleashing the ability of the immune system to eliminate tumor cells. But their approach, which keeps cancer cells from shutting off the immune system’s powerful T-cells...

Read more


Vanderbilt to evaluate NSF-funded, high school engineering curriculum

Oct. 4, 2018—Vanderbilt University is charged with evaluating a new, National Science Foundation-funded course for high school students on engineering principles and design. The $4 million pilot program, entitled Engineering For US All (E4USA), will test the effectiveness of a standardized educational curriculum across multiple states. The course is intended to lead to an eventual pathway for high...

Read more


Quantum mechanics work lets oil industry know promise of recovery experiments before they start

Sep. 28, 2018—Sokrates Pantelides (Joe Howell / Vanderbilt University) With their current approach, energy companies can extract about 35 percent of the oil in each well. Every 1 percent above that, compounded across thousands of wells, can mean billions of dollars in additional revenue for the companies and supply for consumers. Extra oil can be pushed out...

Read more


Rehab engineering team takes second place and $20,000 at pitch competition

Sep. 5, 2018—A team of Vanderbilt School of Engineering entrepreneurs took home second place and $20,000 in startup funds at the recent 36|86: Student Edition pitch competition, part of an annual high profile entrepreneurship conference that draws from across the southeast. Synchro Motion LLC is developing a smart prosthetic ankle that anticipates users’ movements and adjusts to stairs, steep...

Read more